Education

J.D., Harvard Law School

A.B., Georgetown University, Philosophy and History

Research

Areas of Specialization: Ethics, Political Philosophy, Philosophy of Law, and Aesthetics

Additional Research Interests: Feminist Theory, 19th & 20th Century Continental Philosophy, and Bioethics

My philosophical research focuses on ethics, legal and political philosophy, and aesthetics. My dissertation is about what it feels like to be free, the role of spontaneity in the feeling of freedom, why it’s important to experience spontaneous freedom, and what the value of spontaneous freedom means for philosophical conceptions of the good life, of moral agency, and of art. I also conduct research on the philosophical foundations of laws that encourage or discourage creativity (including copyright law), the political morality of nudges, and the aesthetics of games.

Publications

Articles

 

ACADEMIC PUBLICATIONS: PHILOSOPHY

Freedom and the Value of Games,” Canadian Journal of Philosophy, DOI: 10.1080/00455091.2017.1423224.

“The Political Morality of Nudges in Healthcare,” in Nudging Health: Health Law and Behavioral Economics, edited by I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, and Christopher T. Robinson (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016), 97-106.

Poincaré, Sartre, Continuity and Temporality,” Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 37 (2006): 327-330.

ACADEMIC PUBLICATIONS: LAW

“Responding to the Market: The Impact of the Rise of Corporate Law Firms on Elite Legal Education in India,” co-authored with Nick Robinson, in The Indian Legal Profession in the Age of Globalization: The Rise of the Corporate Legal Sector and its Impact on Lawyers and Society, edited by David B. Wilkins, Vikramaditya S. Khanna, and David M. Trubek (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017), chapter 16.

“The Anatomy of Legal Recruitment in India: Tracing the Tracks of Globalization,” co-authored with Vikramaditya Khanna and Aditya Singh, in The Indian Legal Profession in the Age of Globalization: The Rise of the Corporate Legal Sector and its Impact on Lawyers and Society, edited by David B. Wilkins, Vikramaditya S. Khanna, and David M. Trubek (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017), chapter 17.

A.V. ex rel. Vanderhye v. iParadigms, LLC: Electronic Databases and the Compartmentalization of Fair Use,” IDEA: The Intellectual Property Law Review 50 (2010): 345-365 (not peer-reviewed—student-edited law review).

“A Call for Blind Review: Student Edited Law Reviews and Bias,” Journal of Legal Education 59 (2009): 269-278.

WRITING FOR POPULAR AND PROFESSIONAL AUDIENCES

“Malleable Bodies: Flusser, Foucault, Plasticity, and the Corset,” in Malleable Bodies, by KyungHwa Lee (Seoul: National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea, 2015) (exhibition catalogue essay).

“Back to School,” Op-Ed, India Business Law Journal, May 2014, 22.

“Envisioning Legal Education Reform,” co-authored with Aditya Singh, Op-Ed, Critical Twenties, Nov. 10, 2010, http://www.criticaltwenties.in/lawthejudiciary/envisioning-legal-education-reform.

“Don’t Confine Reforms to Elite Law Schools,” co-authored with Aditya Singh, Op-Ed, Tribune (Chandigarh, India), September 9, 2010, available at http://www.tribuneindia.com/2010/20100909/edit.htm#7.

“Writing Requirements, Student Assessment, and Plagiarism in Indian Law Schools,” co-authored with Aditya Singh, India Law News, Fall 2010, 12-15.

Dissertations

Freedom’s Spontaneity

My dissertation is about spontaneous freedom—the sort of freedom evoked by phrases like “free as a bird” and “freedom of the open road.” While the freedom of spontaneity has often been disregarded by analytic moral philosophy, which has focused instead on the freedom of autonomy, I argue that spontaneous freedom is a valuable form of freedom that enables us to feel that we are among the sources of novelty in the world, a feeling that is essential to artistic creativity. Appreciating the value of spontaneous freedom requires modifying contemporary moral theory to make room for this value. I also argue that the study of spontaneous freedom has implications for politics: states should promote spontaneous freedom by providing the material and social preconditions for us to feel that our lives could head in radically different and unanticipated directions.

Honors and Awards

Dissertation Year Fellowship, UCLA Graduate Division, 2017

Graduate Research Mentorship, UCLA Graduate Division, 2013

Graduate Summer Research Mentorship, UCLA Graduate Division, 2013

Irving Oberman Memorial Prize: Intellectual Property, Harvard Law School, 2010

Summer Academic Fellowship, Harvard Law School, 2009

Courses

Courses Taught as Primary Instructor:

  • Medical Ethics
  • Topics in Aesthetic Theory: Popular Art
  • Late 19th and Early 20th Century Philosophy: Nietzsche, Freud, Husserl
  • Topics in Political Philosophy: Paternalism
  • Advanced Honors Seminar: Nudges (taught in connection with “Paternalism”)
  • Moral Responsibility and Free Will
  • Philosophical Analysis of Contemporary Moral Issues
  • Philosophy of Disembodiment (Freshman Seminar)
  • Philosophy of Law
  • Principles of Critical Reasoning
  • Philosophy in Literature

Courses taught as TA:

  • Biotechnology and Society
  • Patriarchy and Anti-patriarchy
  • Introduction to Ethical Theory
  • Philosophy in Literature
  • Introduction to Political Philosophy
  • Kant’s Moral Philosophy
  • Ethics of Friendship
  • Moral Responsibility and Free Will
  • Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
  • Rationality and Action
  • Modern Philosophy, 1650-1800